UK grad shows 2013: D&AD's New Blood

New graduates from all over the country came to London to showcase their work at D&AD's New Blood this week. We round up the best work from the show.


Currently on at Spitalfields Market in East London, the D&AD's New Blood offers a chance to check out some of the best work from new graduates across advertising, graphic design, illustration and (some) animation.

As with most years, the show included a strong showing of talent – though this year it was illustration that was strongest rather than the usual graphic design. We also saw some great projects than spanned graphics, branding and product design – such as Michael Harper's iPhone docks based on literal interpretations of types of music from house to garage.

New Blood is on until the end of tomorrow.

In this article are some of our favourite works from the show. Use the slideshow controls above and right to see them.

Abby Regler

Abby Regler: University of Plymouth

We really liked Abby's The Masquerade Parade Girls (right). It's a monotype print that has been digitally enhanced and coloured – which has allowed her to take the essence of her usually delicate linework, grime it up and create an interesting seemingly random pattern.

abbyregler.co.uk


BBC Suitcase: Arts University Bournemouth

This collaborative project from a group of Arts University Bournemouth students aims to improve the BBC website by introducing the 'BBC Suitcase' concept, a platform that allows users to customise their experience of the BBC.

Take a closer look at BBC Suitcase on Behance.

The students that worked on BBC Suitcase are:

Joshua Ogden

Callum Best

Malin Hassel

Luke Patton

James Smith 

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Ed Bell: Napier University

We thought we were completely bored of big bold type over stark photography until we saw the work of Ed Bell, who has been thoughtful about his typography rather than slapping on the usual Moderist fonts.

His Unsung Heroes & Heroines project explores its subjects's heroes across a series of posters.

edbell.co.uk


Fay Huo: Arts University Bournemouth

Illustrator Fay Huo'a hand-drawn Rooftop Traveller illustrations stood out among the work displayed at New Blood this year.

fayhuo.com


George Lewis-Jones: Wesminster

An optical illusion caused by a poster of George's Osmosis piece (above right) had the honour of being the only project we saw to make us feel a bit freaked out.

A commentary on the use repetition by advertisers to get viewers to subconsciously subsume a brand's message, it's part of Georges's SOS project that explores the use of semiotics and wider psychology in advertising.

georgelewisjones.com

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Josh Turner: Falmouth

The first works we saw to make us laugh, Josh's ads for Lego are pure conceptual brilliance. We also really liked his packaging for John Lewis, which combined both the internal products and negative space in the external packaging with an appealing sense of fun.

cargocollective.com/jturner


Katie Jane Murray: Norwich University of the Arts

Katie Jane Murray used old portraits of her family to create these posters for the Museum of Broken Relationships in Croatia. Katie studied illustration at Norwich University of the Arts.

Katiejanemurray.com

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Kit Russell: Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design

Papercraft was much in evidence at New Blood, but the best by far was Kit Russell's incorporation of it directly into the concept of his Flatland 'interactive' posters. It's based on the 1884 novel by Edwin Abbott Abbott, which combines satire with mathematical puzzling in a story of a literally two-dimensional character of a square as it visits one- and three-dimensional worlds (where it meets a sphere).

In response to this, Kit has constructred a flat poster (above right) that can be deconstructed to form a sphere (below right).

kitrussell.co.uk


Martha Anne: Falmouth

Most graduates who want to work in narrative illustration have their eyes on comics, book covers, editorial work and children's picture books – but Martha wants to reclaim the place of illustration within the pages of adult-focussed novels. And we wish her all the best with this as it's a form that could with more popular revival, especially now full-colour reading devices such as the iPad mini mean digital books aren't confined to the Kindle's black and gray.

Martha has created illustrations in this form for the likes of the Kama Sutra (right), Lady Chatterley's Lover, and Captain Corelli's Mandolin.

martha-anne.co.uk


Michael Harper: Middlesex University

Each building in Michael Harper's BeatCity can house a speaker, through which you can play music from an iPod or other music player. The buildings, which include 'Gospel Music', 'Garage Music', 'House Music', 'Heavy Metal Music', and 'Elevator Music', are made up of nine elements that fit together to create the finished structure.

Michael has also designed a BeatCity app that lets users pick a house that suits them and provides instructions on how to build the house.

mdxuntangled.com

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Ramona Hartman: Middlesex Unversity

There's always someone at these shows taking aim at hipsters (often while looking like one themselves), but Ramona's Hipster Metropoly was charmingly presented, incredibly well made and more gently mocking than knocking.

behance.net/RamonaHartmann


Robert Marshall: University of Cumbria

Robert Marshall says that his Porn Monsters started out as an editorial piece on the changing face of pornography, but it turned into something completely different. His Muckle Toon branding design was also on show at New Blood.

See more of Robert's work in his portfolio on this site.


Angela and Luca: University of Greenwich

Branding and graphic design duo Angela Hayrabedyan and Luca Grosso impressed with their careful use of strands of paper and other cuts.

The project shown right was for Lateral Symphony, a separate grad show created by the duo along with Jason Williams and Gurcan Ergur.

wearenoone.co.uk

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