Best of the Grad Shows 2017: London College of Communication

11 talented illustrators and designers that stood out at London College of Communication’s (LCC) Design School degree show.


The hectic grad show season is well underway across the UK, and we delved into the minds of young creatives by checking out the work by talented graphic design and illustration students from London College of Communication's Design School.

Graduate projects in the disciplines of branding, graphic, social and immersive design blew us away, as well as a range of stunning and thought-provoking illustrations.

Take a look and be inspired by the work from design students such as Peter Roden, who designed a new identity and educational augmented realty experience for an obscure Parkland Walk in Crouch End (seen here), or Amy Cranston, whose series of illustrations depict the challenges of growing up in the Philippines and the UK.

It’s also worth checking out or list of UK's best grad shows dates and locations, and advice from university lecturers on how to nail your grad show.

Design: Peter Roden

Peter Roden is a man of many talents and interests, including augmented reality, data visuals and food (ceramics) - all of which he managed to turn into projects for the grad show.

For this project – which was by far the biggest standout for us – Peter aims to inject life into an obscure parkland walk in north London’s Crouch End neighbourhood. His educational walk experience uses stencils, signs and augmented reality.

Peter created a new identity and experience for the walk, giving the local community more opportunity to engage with their history, wildlife and natural environment.


Design: Peter Roden

Wooden signs created to look rusted, accompanied by stencil typography, act as triggers for an interactive mobile app he created to deliver additional information about the surroundings of the walk.

www.peter-roden.com

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Design: Will Lenthal

Will’s concertina-like display explores what objects he would sell if there was no currency left, and what objects he would get in return such as an iPhone or trainers. His simple green ink illustrations, although perhaps hard to see in this image, act as a powerful narrative.


Design: Layla Grainger

Layla Grainger is passionate about social design (design for a good cause). She has a fair few projects already under her belt, such as her 3D curation 'Unpredictability', in which she asked artists to use peculiar tools to create natural brush markings.

In the project featured here, Layla brought together her love for horticulture and social design to create Flori - a brand to educate a younger generation of "green fingered enthusiasts" with events tailored to each city.

www.laylagrainger.com


Design: Celeste Ho

Celeste Ho's Breezy App is a proposed digital system that links together how people use their transport and travel cards, including features such as switching cities on the app, topping up anywhere and a fare calculator.

We think the app design is incredibly clever – you can check out more of her Breezy mock-up videos and templates here

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Design: Celeste Ho

On a more serious note, Celeste's art therapy kit is designed to help with thoughts of depression. The kit is aimed to create a visual form of the thoughts of people who struggle with mental health issues - bad thoughts are written with disappearing ink, and good thoughts with watercolour.

www.cforceleste.com


Design: Keenen Sutherland

Keenen interprets a short story by Jorge Luis Borges - La Loteria en Babilonia aka The Lottery in Babylon. It’s a fantasy short story in which all activities are dictated by an all-encompassing lottery - a metaphor for the role of chance in one’s life.

He created a story in which the reader chooses a number from each section, and as they navigate through the story, the end will "reveal if you have read the story in the right order".


Design: Keenen Sutherland

This is an animated flip book which illustrates the random selection process of a lottery.

keenensutherland.uk

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Illustration: Amy Cranston

Amy's series of illustrations are inspired by a childhood faced with the challenges of growing up both in the Philippians and the UK. 


Illustration: Amy Cranston

We thought they were incredibly beautiful, so we've featured all three illustrations here.


Illustration: Amy Cranston

"Don't" was the only word in Filipino that Amy knew how to say ("Wag") for a while, so she incorporated it into this illustration. 

amycranston.tumblr.com/

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Illustration: Tabitha Wykeham

We love Tabitha's bright and bold collection of 19 illustrated wooden panels inspired by Tabitha’s time spent in Europe. Each panel is representative of a memory from her travels, beginning in Poznan, then to Wroclaw, Prague, Budapest, Berlin and finally Hamburg.

Building, patters, people, signs and bits of text that Tabitha food represent her journey. The format explores the way small fragments of memory come together to create a complete experience.

tabbywykehamillustration.squarespace.com/


Illustration: Isabelle Dubik

Isabelle came to London from the North. With Catholic grandparents, she's been fascinated with religion, and decided to merge many concepts into these two, rather small but captivating illustrations. It's definitely worth checking out some of her other work.

isabelledubik.com/


Illustration: Joanna Hartley

Jo's You're Welcome illustration series made us laugh as soon as we saw it. 

Her idyllic scenes are paired perfectly with words depicting the not-so glamorous side of life, such as a seagull shitting on you. No wonder she’s a big fan of Mr Bingo.

@jmh.illustrate

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Illustration: Joanna Hartley


Illustration: Harry West

Harry West's sketches may have been small and inconspicuous, but if you look closely they're full of detailed and intriguing characters and landscape. 

harrywestillustration.tumblr.com/


Illustration: Tracy Lam

We were drawn to this beautiful illustration which represents the travels of student Tracy Lam, who's based in Hong Kong and London. With soft tones and strokes, the entire piece is designed to be in the form of a waterfall, and depicts landscapes found in exotic corners of the world, such as Iceland. 

behance.net/tracytszts7dd5

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