Best of the Grad Shows 2017: Winchester School of Art

These graphic art students explore the concepts of consumerism, feminism and queer theory through textiles, ceramics and illustration.


Winchester School of Art (the art school of the University of Southampton) came to London to showcase the diverse projects by the graduates of its Graphic Art course.

As a cross-disciplinary course it includes motion design, graphic design, illustration and photography. Many student's projects centred around illustration on an object.

Whether it be clothes, ceramics or a magazine, we take a look at the inspiring projects to come out of the university’s Graphic Arts London Show this year.

Image: Sam Elston

Sam Elston

Illustrator and cartoonist Sam Elston has created a collection of 16 hand-painted food cans, as his first foray into ceramics. Sam's 'supermarket' encourages shoppers to think about what they should invest in, concepts such as individuality and curiosity rather than consumerism.

samelston.com/


Sam Elston

Sam was inspired by Ted Polhemus' essay Supermarket of Style, which explores how we crave authenticity. Adding an extra dimension, Sam has added ingredients like 'cream of contentment' and 'happiness extract'. His ceramics were exhibited alongside a trolley filled with sketchbooks in bags from fictional supermarket Elstons.

samelston.com/

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Hiffy Ulrich

Hiffy works in both worlds of illustration and textiles. After creating colourful illustrations exploring feminism, loneliness and body image, her final project – the 7 Day Outfit – took form. It’s based on an origami-inspired garment that can be folded, reversed and tied up to morph into seven different variations. The idea sprung from research into clothes wastage.

hiffyulrich.com/


Hugo Loynes

Hugo Loynes has created a magazine designed to make queer theory more accessible for the everyday reader. He invited artists, writers and photographers from around the UK to contribute to the first issue – Queer Blood.

hug0.design/home.html

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Hugo Loynes

The magazine, called De-, combines Hugo’s talent for typography with oversized illustrations.

hug0.design/home.html


Anna Kermani

Anna Kermani has created a typeface that combines the English alphabet with phonetic signifiers from Arabic and Farsi scripts to help users learn the new characters. Anna herself is an Iranian refugee, who was expelled from both her graphics degree at the University at Tehran and later Iran after her involvement in the Green Movement protests in 2009. 

Anna was encouraged by WSA tutors to use her background to develop Terra Nullius – a nationhood for refugees like herself that includes life jacket passports, a flag, and its own typeface, Terra Nullius Regular.

@anahitakermani_


Anna Kermani

She created the typeface using Illustrator and font design software Glyph. The typeface features multiple versions of some letter to help readers distinguish between problematic sounds such as long and short vowels.

@anahitakermani_

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