KennardPhillipps creates horrific versions of famous artworks for latest Greenpeace anti-Shell campaign

KennardPhillipps and Greenpeace have set three well-known American landscape paintings on fire to reveal how their subjects would be ravaged by environmental pollution.


Greenpeace's latest campaign sees three iconic American landscape paintings destroyed in an attempt to draw attention to Shell's first attempt to drill for oil in the Arctic.

The paintings are, of course, prints – but seeing Andrew Wyeth's Christina's World, David Hockey's Pearblossom Highway and William Bradford's An Arctic Summer: Boring Through the Pack in Melville Bay set on fire still packs an emotional punch. What's revealed are horrific versions of the paintings with oil spills taken from photos of environmental disasters, which have been created by artists KennardPhillipps – the duo behind Photo Op (aka Tony Blair's Iraq Selfie).

Image: KennardPhillipps' take on Andrew Wyeth's Christina's World.

“We sorted through hundreds of photos of oil accidents," says a statement from KennardPhillipps. "We have superimposed these real oil spills onto the American dream and the pristine icebergs of the Arctic.
 
“The poet Shelley wrote that as artists and writers, ‘we must imagine what we know’. We have tried to imagine through images what we know about oil exploitation. We must imagine what we know about Shell. We know that whatever the consequences to life, they are drilling for one thing – dollars.”

Image: KennardPhillipps' take on David Hockney's Pearblossom Highway.

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The campaign's called A Song of Oil, Ice and Fire. Can we stop with the throwaway, irrelevant Game of Thrones references in campaigns please? Leave it for things that are actually related (or kids TV parodies).

\Image: David Hockney's Pearblossom Highway.


Image: KennardPhillipps' take on William Bradford's An Arctic Summer: Boring Through the Pack in Melville Bay.


Image: William Bradford's An Arctic Summer: Boring Through the Pack in Melville Bay.

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