Rare Heath Robinson illustrations unveiled

A new set of rare illustrations by Heath Robinson featuring his absurd contraptions is being showcased. See what's on show.


McCann London is hosting the first ever exhibition of William Heath Robinson's commercial illustrations in its era-appropriate grade 2 listed Art Deco office in Russell Square, London.

The prints on display include adverts Heath Robinson created in the 1920s and 30s for current McCann clients including Great Western Trains, Shredded Wheat and Daimler, the original occupants of the building.

Also on show are series of original pieces from the artist's 1936 book ‘How To Live In A Flat’ poking fun at the architecture of his day – with this in mind McCann London has constructed the balloon washing-lines seen on the book cover in its atrium.

William Heath Robinson (1872-1944) was one of the UK’s most popular artists of his era, his name becoming synonymous with the humorous, unlikely and ingenious contraptions that he drew.


This is the first exhibition of Heath Robinson’s illustration work in advertising – a wide
ranging exploration of his commercial commissions.

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Curated by Geoffrey Beare, a trustee at the forthcoming Heath Robinson Museum in Pinner (opening 2016), this exhibition brings together a selection of vintage publications showing works in print alongside original drawings poking fun at modernist design and architecture  of  the era.


McCann’s spectacular Grade 2 listed Art Deco headquarters in Russell Square is an ideal exhibition space.

Built in 1931, this was originally a Daimler car showroom, a marque for which Heath Robinson created a series of illustrations.

These are included in this exhibition alongside work for brands including Shredded Wheat and Great Western Trains, both advertising clients of McCann London.


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