This art's on A Journey Through Science Fiction

To coincide with its wonderful new sci-fi exhibition, the Barbican has commissioned and curated a selection of sublime artworks. See them here.


The Barbican's current exhibition, Into the Unknown: A Journey through Science Fiction, celebrates the vision of future offered by sci-fi in media from film and music to comics and games. The show contains objects from Jules Verne's original manuscripts to John Hurt's spacesuit from Alien, and there are installations linked to Black Mirror and The Martian (by Territory Studio, creators of the huge holographic ads in Ghost In The Shell).

Alongside this, the London venue's shop has brought together wares from books to posters to jewellery that any design-minded individual would appreciate. The headline items are four specially commissioned Penguin Classics novels with covers designed by Jamie Keenan. These draw on the brutalist architecture of the Barbican Centre and its surrounding estate, its towers emblazoned with the IngSoc's slogans – 'War is Peace', Freedom is Slavery' – for 1984.

A gorilla lurks in the Barbican's Conservatory for The Island of Doctor Moreau.


The Martini Bar becomes A Clockwork Orange's Korova Milk Bar.

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And the 'engine room' that powers the Barbican for below is reinvented as the birthplace of Frankenstein's monster.

Each of the books is the subject of book club events alongside the exhibition.


There's a series of sci-fi-inspired prints brought together by a competition by illustration magazine The Warp. Artists who entered work include BloodBros, Ed Blunt, Guy Warley, Andrew Hulme, and Kirsty Fabiyi.

Artwork by Andrew Hulme.


Artwork by BloodBros

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Artwork by Ed Blunt


Artwork by Guy Warley


Artwork by Kirsty Fabiyi

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If you're after something to wear rather than to hang, one of our favourite jewellery brands – East London-based Tatty Devine – has applied its much-copied look to space-themed necklaces and brooches.


Illustrator Tom Clohosy has created a pattern of the just-what-do-they-do buttons, lights and switches that we associate with the Golden Age of space travel (and, arguably, science fiction). This has been applied to a T-shirt, bag and other assorted paraphernalia.