Portfolio: Kervin Brisseaux

Kervin Brisseaux is a master of bold, bright artworks for the likes of Nike. Check out his portfolio.

Kervin Brisseaux is a designer based in New York, who works both for Vault 49 and freelance.

His clients have included Atlantic Records, Nike and Digital Arts.

Sum up your style or approach in 5 words

Acid colors meets sci-fi aesthetics.

Who or what is your biggest influence and why?

'Who' would be a tough thing to pin down. I work with a variety of people that influence me daily. Combine that with creatives I discover on a weekly basis, that list would be too long to mention. In terms of  'what', mainly it's the craft, energy, and time people put into their work; the unrelenting dedication of creating something DOPE.

What's the first thing you do when you receive a brief?

If it's commission, open dialogue with the client is key, before and during the sketch phase. Things can easily slip through the cracks if there questions on either side that aren't immediately addressed. For me its important that the end game is clear so that I'm not simply punching in the dark. That way our time is used efficiently. That's not to say that projects never regress, but it's less likely to happen when the gaps of an idea are addressed head on.

Tell us a bit about your creative process

My process is pretty generic and simple. What sparks an idea could be an image I come across on tumblr, or a track from an album, etc. After that, I put on the headphones, and with the right tunes in queue, I get things going. Music is definitely an important part of the process. It's almost as important as the Wacom and computer I use to make the work.  

What's the one thing you couldn't live without as an artist?

Based on my previous answer, you'd probably guess that music would be a tough for me to live without.

What music to you like to work to?

Anything and everything that fits the mood. The right soundtrack will give me the mediation I need to see an idea through. The two most common genres for me are house and hip hop, but I definitely make room for others whenever I need to.  

What's been your favourite work that you've created, and why?

My favorite work that I have ever done was also my most ambitious; my design thesis. It was a narrative that tried to critically look at humanity's technological dependencies within the extremely deadly conditions of outer space. The overall story was very melancholic and sci-fi – think Black Mirror meets Star Trek).  It was a total of 25 illustrations and it's still incomplete. I plan on finishing that story and maybe share it one day.  

What's the project you'd rather forget about?

Almost anything having to do with brochures or pamphlets.

Who's the artist working today you admire most?

I've been appreciating the work of a lot of fine artists lately. One that comes to mind at the moment is James Jean.

What's inspiring you most recently?

I've been drawing a lot of influence from fashion. So much so, that it's sparked me to start a new illustrative series that I've been working on over the last year now called Acid Fashion – [though] the name of it is constantly changing.

It's a personal project where are augment found fashion photography with vector illustrated clothing. Since starting this project, I've had the pleasure of collaborating with a few fashion photographers and artists.

Where would you like to take your work in the future?

I'm currently seeking ways that my work can exist physically rather than just on a screen. Producing more printed work for exhibitions is a start, but eventually, it'd be great to build some of my ideas as 3D sculptures. I think projects like my Neon Taxidermy series would do well in that medium and scale.


Fresh, a personal piece.

Kervin Brisseaux is a designer based in New York, who works both for Vault 49 and freelance.

His clients have included Atlantic Records, Nike and Digital Arts.

Sum up your style or approach in 5 words

Acid colors meets sci-fi aesthetics.

Who or what is your biggest influence and why?

'Who' would be a tough thing to pin down. I work with a variety of people that influence me daily. Combine that with creatives I discover on a weekly basis, that list would be too long to mention. In terms of  'what', mainly it's the craft, energy, and time people put into their work; the unrelenting dedication of creating something DOPE.

Just Do It

What's the first thing you do when you receive a brief?

If it's commission, open dialogue with the client is key, before and during the sketch phase. Things can easily slip through the cracks if there are questions on either side that aren't immediately addressed.

For me, it's important that the end game is clear so that I'm not simply punching in the dark. That way our time is used efficiently. That's not to say that projects never regress, but it's less likely to happen when the gaps of an idea are addressed head on.


An illustration for Alvin Risk's Venture campaign.

Tell us a bit about your creative process

My process is pretty generic and simple. What sparks an idea could be an image I come across on tumblr, or a track from an album, etc.

After that, I put on the headphones, and with the right tunes in queue, I get things going. Music is definitely an important part of the process. It's almost as important as the Wacom and computer I use to make the work. 

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A commissioned illustration based on the Nike Futura logo.

What's the one thing you couldn't live without as an artist?

Based on my previous answer, you'd probably guess that music would be a tough for me to live without.


Rage, a personal project depicting metamorphosis.

What music to you like to work to?

Anything and everything that fits the mood. The right soundtrack will give me the mediation I need to see an idea through. The two most common genres for me are house and hip hop, but I definitely make room for others whenever I need to. 


The Bear, from a self-initiated 3D neon taxidermy series.

What's been your favourite work that you've created, and why?

My favorite work that I have ever done was also my most ambitious; my design thesis. It was a narrative that tried to critically look at humanity's technological dependencies within the extremely deadly conditions of outer space. The overall story was very melancholic and sci-fi – think Black Mirror meets Star Trek).

It was a total of 25 illustrations and it's still incomplete. I plan on finishing that story and maybe share it one day. 

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The Wolf, from a self-initiated 3D neon taxidermy series.

What's the project you'd rather forget about?

Almost anything having to do with brochures or pamphlets.


A multi-coloured crewneck sweater designed for Osneaker's apparel line.

Who's the artist working today you admire most?

I've been appreciating the work of a lot of fine artists lately. One that comes to mind at the moment is James Jean.