Portfolio: Rebekka Dunlap

Rebekka Dunlap is an illustrator based in Brooklyn, New York.

Rebekka Dunlap is a freelance illustrator based in Brooklyn, New York, creating comics and online content, as well as illustrations for apps and leading publications.

We asked Rebekka to share some of her ideas and influences, as well as some of her fascinating artwork.

 Why do your clients/customers choose you?

I'm not sure. I guess my work is good at tackling topics that are emotional or melancholy.

Who or what is your biggest influence and why?

When I was younger I was heavily influenced by Shoujo Manga, science fiction movies and the film Princess Mononoke!

I still think a lot about film, especially documentaries and anything that takes me to a very emotionally exhausting place.

What's the first thing you do when you start a project?

If it’s editorial I’ll try and read the article as soon as possible. That way I can kind of carry the idea around and let it incubate while I’m traveling on the train, or making dinner.

Sometimes good ideas are really difficult to see if you look at them straight on, so you kind of have to let it grow a bit to be good.

What are your favourite creative tools/software and what do they bring to your work?

I execute all of my illustrations with a Wacom Tablet in Photoshop. But I do a lot of thinking and drawing with a brush pen.

What's the one thing you couldn't live without as an artist?

Right now it’s knowing that I’m part of a community of people doing this. It’s hard to talk to people about your life when they don’t understand the specific stresses of being an artist.

What music do you like to work to (and why)?

Lately it’s been a lot of Nicki Minaj and 8tracks.com playlists. You can search for what mood you’re in and go from there, which is nice since most of the music I listen to when walking around is way too poppy and distracting.

What's been your favourite artwork that you've created, and why do you feel this?

My comics. They’re more personal and dark. When I make them it feels very true to what I want to achieve as a creative person.

What's the project you'd rather forget about?

I don’t want to forget about anything. Terrible experiences have taught me what to look out for and avoid.

Who is the artist working today that you admire most?

I’m pretty proud of my friend Jeremy Sorese who’s writing a gigantic emotional sci-fi graphic novel.

What has been inspiring you most recently?

Films about middle aged women bonding.

What are you working on right now?

I’m drawing a comic for Youth In Decline that will be out in September.

Where would you like to take your work in the future?

I want to have more fun while drawing and incorporate more writing into my comics.

Where can we see your work ?

www.RebekkaDunlap.com, www.RebekkaDunlap.tumblr.com , Instagram (@rrebekkaa) & Twitter (@RebekkaDunlap)

Blank Space


Blank Space: Illustration for a Hazlitt Article by Lauren Quinn about memory

Rebekka is a freelance illustrator based in Brooklyn, New York, creating comics and online content, as well as illustrations for apps and leading publications.

DA: Why do your clients/customers choose you?

RD: "I'm not sure. I guess my work is good at tackling topics that are emotional or melancholy."

DA: Who or what is your biggest influence and why?

RD: "When I was younger I was heavily influenced by Shoujo Manga, science fiction movies and the film Princess Mononoke".

"I still think a lot about film, especially documentaries and anything that takes me to a very emotionally exhausting place."

Encryption

Encryption – for an MIT Technology review article about data encryption

DA: What's the first thing you do when you start a project?

RD: "If it’s editorial, I’ll try and read the article as soon as possible. That way I can kind of carry the idea around and let it incubate while I’m traveling on the train, or making dinner.

"Sometimes good ideas are really difficult to see if you look at them straight on, so you kind of have to let it grow a bit to be good.

DA: What are your favourite creative tools and what do they bring to your work?

RD: "I execute all of my illustrations with a Wacom Tablet in Photoshop. But I do a lot of thinking and drawing with a brush pen."


Lights Out Nigeria

Lights Out Nigeria – for an article by the same name by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, about the unreliability of electricity in Nigeria that appeared in the New York Times

DA: What music do you like to work to?

RD: "Lately it’s been a lot of Nicki Minaj and 8tracks.com playlists. You can search for what mood you’re in and go from there, which is nice since most of the music I listen to when walking around is way too poppy and distracting."

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Parenting on the Dark Side

Parenting on the Dark Side: For a New York Times Article by Sharma Schields on how to share your darker experiences as a parent with your children

DA: What's the project you'd rather forget about?

RD: "I don’t want to forget about anything. Terrible experiences have taught me what to look out for and avoid.

DA: What's been your favourite artwork that you've created, and why do you feel this?

RD: "My comics. They’re more personal and dark. When I make them it feels very true to what I want to achieve as a creative person."


An Atlas of Genetic Time

An Atlas of Genetic Time: For a New Yorker article by Amanda Schaffer about the future of gene specific medications

DA: What's the one thing you couldn't live without as an artist?

RD: "Right now it’s knowing that I’m part of a community of people doing this. It’s hard to talk to people about your life when they don’t understand the specific stresses of being an artist."


Can You Be a Waitress and a Feminist

Can You Be a Waitress and a Feminist – for a New York Times article by Brittany Bronson, on the ethics of identifying as a feminist while working in a misogynistic industry

DA: Who is the artist working today that you admire most?

RD: "I’m pretty proud of my friend Jeremy Sorese who’s writing a gigantic emotional sci-fi graphic novel.

DA: What has been inspiring you most recently?

RD: "Films about middle-aged women bonding."

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Marion Cotillard

A portrait of the actress Marion Cotillard for Hazlitt’s Notable Mugs project.

DA: What are you working on right now?

RD: "I’m drawing a comic for Youth In Decline that will be out in September."

DA: Where would you like to take your work in the future?

RD: "I want to have more fun while drawing and incorporate more writing into my comics."